Switching to renewable energy could save thousands of lives in Africa

With economies and populations surging, an industrial revolution is inevitable on the African continent. The question is, what's going to power it? With renewable energy cheaper and more efficient than ever, countries in Africa have the unique opportunity to harness...

Money spent on beer ads linked to underage drinking

Advertising budgets and strategies used by beer companies appear to influence underage drinking, according to new research from Iowa State University. The findings show that the amount of money spent on advertising strongly predicted the percentage of teens who had...

Helicopter parents and ‘hothouse children’ — exploring the high stakes of family dynamics

True helicopter parents talk a good game in making their actions all about their children, but according to one West Virginia University researcher, what they're doing is reaping -- and heaping -- the rewards for themselves. Kristin Moilanen, associate professor...

HIV drug exposure in womb may increase child risk of microcephaly, developmental delays

Children born to women on HIV therapy containing the drug efavirenz were 2 to 2.5 times more likely to have microcephaly, or small head size, compared to children born to women on regimens of other antiretroviral drugs, according to an...

AI could transform how we monitor the structural health of civil infrastructure

The University of Surrey and King's College London have developed a new machine learning algorithm (AI) that could transform the way we monitor major infrastructure -- such as dams and bridges. In a paper published by the journal Structural Health...

‘Bad cholesterol’ is only as unhealthy as its composition

New research at Ohio University shows that a particular subclass of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), also known as "bad cholesterol," is a much better predictor of potential heart attacks than the mere presence of LDL, which is incorrect more often than...

People in counties with worse economies are more likely to die from heart disease

Communities in the United States that experienced the most economic distress in the wake of the Great Recession saw a significant increase in death rates from heart disease and strokes among middle-aged people, according to a new multi-institution study led...

The difference between an expert’s brain and a novice’s

When mice learn to do a new task, their brain activities change over time as they advance from 'novice' to 'expert.' The changes are reflected in the wiring of cell circuits and activities of neurons. Using a two-photon imaging microscope...

Don’t confuse luck with skill when rewarding performance

Managers and those who evaluate the performance of others, whether in the workplace or on the sporting field, are likely to be often confusing luck with skill, and over rewarding those who are just lucky, a new study reveals. The...

Opioid prescription doses are increasingly being tapered, often more rapidly than recommended

Stigma and safety fears have made daily dose tapering of opioid prescriptions more common. New research from UC Davis Health physicians, however, shows tapering can occur at rates as much as six times higher than recommended, putting patients at risk...
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